Do not run!

The final moments that typically precede hand to hand combat are when two opponents have found the resolve to engage their enemy. In one or both of their minds, they have decided that overcoming their opponent is possible. They also have accepted the risks associated with their choice. Whether the scenario is in a controlled environment such as a training exercise or the situation is real, there is a feeling that must be overcome – Intimidation.

I have been in many real and simulated physical confrontations, the latter being the most recent and frequent. Even when training with people I am familiar with and in a controlled environment, I have to consciously address some things mentally. One is whether I am aware of any level of intimidation I feel in that moment. The other is the importance of controlling my emotions by channeling them into focus on my actions. The intimidation (if present) has to be acknowledged and placed into perspective; am I really at risk? Am I communicating to my opponent apprehension or timidity? The emotional control is important because it will manifest in how I respond, both defensively and offensively.

When engaged in combat there is a risk of tunnel vision, rapid breathing, and muscle exhaustion from being overwrought. Combat breathing techniques regulate your breathing and aid with preventing tunnel vision. Allowing your mind to accept the encounter and ‘relax’ will prevent unnecessary muscle expenditure.

Intimidation…sometimes the fear of an encounter is worse than the encounter itself. Intimidation is when a response is forced upon someone by reason of threat. It is when someone frightens another to submit or comply with them. Feelings of discouragement come upon the intimidated because they perceive the intimidator to be superior to them. If they believe the intimidator, compliance with their wishes will follow.

In his inaugural speech, President John F Kennedy said “Let us never negotiate out of fear” The spirit behind these words is one of internal strength and resolve to avoid yielding to terror. Intimidation, whether valid or unnecessary, can be overcome. The power it possesses is found, not in the threat but in the one being threatened. If the terror being issued cannot penetrate the heart of the threatened, the power is lost. Intimidation is not just an external issue, it can originate within us. We can create our own fears and thus become controlled by them. Since perception is reality then everything rises or falls upon how we perceive a thing.

In conclusion, the account of a statement made by Robert Harper offers an appropriate response to intimidation. The year was 1798 and American diplomats had returned from France. They were sent to negotiate with the French regarding attacks that were being made upon American naval vessels. The French were attacking the American ships because they felt their “waters were being sailed”. The offer by the French to the diplomats was one of tribute, if the American ships wanted to sail their waters they could pay a toll and the threat of attack would be removed. It was in response to the French’s request for tribute that Robert Harper declared that America had “Millions for defense but not one penny for tribute”.

Never run from what opposes you, if you start running you will never quit running.

Copyright © 2012 J.M. Cortés

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